Product of the Week!!!

We have Lunkerhunt Frogs!!!
The Lunkerhunt Frog is the most lifelike frog currently available in the industry. They replicate adult and young frogs and feature an amazing swimming leg design that extends and retracts during retrieve for an astonishingly true-to-life presentation. Lunkerhunt Frogs behave just like a living frog would in the water. When paused, they rest at an advantageous 45-degree angle, which gives it a natural look and also results in higher hook-up percentages. They are designed with a soft-body that collapses easily upon attack and quickly exposes its razor-sharp double frog hook. This also results in higher hook-up percentages. Lunkerhunt Frogs feature high quality components and a weedless design. Available in some of the most vivid frog colors on the market. We have them in Yappa, Compact, Lunker, and Pocket varieties. All right here at your friendly neighborhood Pipe Rack!

 

FISHY FACTS

See-Through Sea Salps:
These creatures are like something straight out of a science fiction movie.
These tiny barrel-shaped organisms move through the water by pumping water through their gelatinous bodies, munching on phytoplankton as they go.
Sea Salps are known for their unique life cycle, during which they exist both as individuals and part of a larger organism.
Four-inch (10.2 centimeter) sea salps link together to make luminous chains up to fifteen feet (4.6 meters) long!

 

Product of the Week!!!

We have the M by Macanudo cigar!
This is the first infused Macanudo, known simply as “M.” With rich, lingering nuances of single-origin gourmet Colombian coffee, this cigar is perfect to enjoy as your first stick of the day, or when you’re looking to wrap up your night. Handmade in the Dominican Republic, each M by Macanudo features an Indonesian Bezuki wrapper leaf with Phillipine Isabella binder tobacco and Nicaraguan long-fillers. Toast the foot and you’ll find notes of cedar, earth, and spice, backed by a strong coffee flavor for a creamy blend that’s just screaming to be paired up with a steaming cup o’ joe. The corona is just $8.45 and the toro is just $9.15, right here at your friendly neighborhood Pipe Rack!

 

FISHY FACTS

Catfish:
Catfish can be found across the Buckeye State, but they vary in types and sizes. Whether it is bullheads in farm ponds, channel catfish and flathead catfish in reservoirs and rivers, or blue catfish in the Ohio River, many anglers seek catfish not only for their fight but for their table fare as well. Catfish sustain populations by natural reproduction in many habitats but is not true in all of Ohio’s smaller reservoirs, many of which are stocked with channel catfish by the Division of Wildlife.
Tips
Anglers use a variety of scented baits since a catfish’s sense of smell and taste is excellent. The most effective baits include cut shad, prepared blood bait, chicken livers, shrimp and nightcrawlers. Keep tackle simple. When fishing on the bottom, use a fixed or slip sinker and when fishing the surface or suspended, try either a slip or fixed float. Hook sizes range from size 4 to 6/0 depending upon the size of fish you are seeking and the size of bait that you are using. Having a strike indicator is a good idea for catching catfish. Catfish do not “hit and run” like other fish, instead, they move very slowly away with baits.
Tackle
Rods and reels should be matched for the sizes of catfish that you anticipate catching. Standard tackle for channel catfish or bullheads includes medium spinning or baitcasting outfits with 10-12 pound line, whereas for flathead catfish or blue catfish, heavy rods and reels with 20- or 30-pound line may be required. Reels used for catfish should have a good drag system.
Season
Summer (June-mid-September)
Peak Activity
Excellent, especially at night
Prepared baits start to work well this time of year, as do chicken liver, shrimp, crayfish or live fish. In general, the larger the bait, the larger the catfish.
Catfish prefer deeper habitats during the day and shallower habitats while feeding at night. Productive night areas include shallow flats next to deeper holes and next to swimming beaches, particularly where the bottom is stirred up during the day.

 

The Pipe Racks’ Perfectly Prodigious Peerless Product Promotion!!!

We have Team Stopper Lures  , Bass Stoppers!
We have the Original, 2-hook weedless, and 3-hook weedless as well as the Magnum (features a larger profile then the Original stopper), Magnum 2-hook weedless, and Magnum 3-hook weedless. All in a wide variety of colors.
The Bass Stopper Lures Rigged Worm is a ready-to-fish, anise-scented worm with a hand-tied inside mono leader. The snelled hooks are evenly spaced and do not inhibit the worm’s supple, undulating action; if a fish hits, the odds are high that he’ll be solidly hooked! Great for bass and walleye. All between $2.28-$2.48!
All right here at your friendly neighborhood Pipe Rack.

 

 

FISHY FACTS

We found an interesting article from Ohio Cooperative Living about Ohio’s connections to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Services 150 year celebration.
In February, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USF&WS) turned 150 years old, and to celebrate its sesquicentennial, it has released a new book of its many finny accomplishments titled America’s Bountiful Waters.
A compendium of all things piscatorial, the book details the long history of fisheries management in the U.S. and highlights many of the service’s most well-known employees — including two Ohioans who are prominently featured: Bob Hines and James Henshall.
Henshall (1836–1925) is known as the father of bass fishing in the U.S. He was born in Maryland and moved to Cincinnati after graduating high school. He finished medical studies in 1859, just in time for the Civil War, and promptly joined the Union Army medical corps. One of his most memorable adventures was a run-in with Morgan’s Raiders, a Confederate cavalry unit that crossed the Ohio River and was eventually captured near West Point, in Columbiana County.

In addition to his interest in medicine, Henshall began studying fish culture after the war, and he became one of the earliest American authorities on sport fishing.
A dedicated angler all his life, he was also a prolific writer — one of the most famous fishing writers of his day — contributing articles to both Forest & Stream and The American Angler, the premier outdoor journals of the era. He is most remembered for his magnum opus, Book of the Black Bass. Published in 1881, it sold nearly half a million copies, with more still being sold today.
Hines (1912–1994) was born in Columbus and became interested in the outdoors at a young age. He made it his life’s work while hunting, fishing, and camping close to the Sandusky River near Fremont, Ohio. He was a young staff artist for the Ohio Division of Wildlife in 1948 when he was lured away to work for the USF&WS. No doubt he had gained attention of the agency by designing the art for the 1946 Federal Duck Stamp with his image of redhead ducks. Hines eventually took over leadership of that federal annual art competition, overseeing and improving the event for more than 30 years.
Hines produced untold numbers of illustrations during his time with the USF&WS, including the first four U.S. postage stamps to feature species of wildlife: wild turkey, pronghorn antelope, king salmon, and whooping crane. He was especially proud of his 1963 Ducks at a Distance, a waterfowl identification pocket guide for hunters that became a bestseller for the Department of the Interior. He is the only individual in the history of the organization to hold the title of National Wildlife Artist. Hines’ image of a cutthroat trout adorns the cover of the new book (see image above).
An interesting sidenote about Hines’ long career with the USF&WS is that his first supervisor was Rachel Carson, who would go on to pen Silent Spring in 1962. The book sounded the alarm concerning indiscriminate use of pesticides and helped kick-start the environmental movement of the 1960s and 1970s.
America’s Bountiful Waters has another Ohio connection. The book was edited by an expatriot Buckeye, Craig Springer, who now lives in New Mexico. If his name sounds familiar, that could be because he occasionally writes articles for this magazine. Along with editing, Springer also contributed several stories to America’s Bountiful Waters; one of them is a remembrance of catching his first feisty smallmouth bass from Four Mile Creek, near Oxford, which gave him something else in common with Henshall.
“James Henshall and I both caught our first smallmouth bass on an Independence Day outing in southwest Ohio,” Springer says. “They just happened more than a century apart.”
-W.H. “Chip” Gross is Ohio Cooperative Living’s outdoors editor.

 

The Pipe Racks’ Perfectly Prodigious Peerless Product Promotion!!!

Gurkha Castle Hall Cigars
Earlier this year, Gurkha revamped its Castle Hall line and now it is getting a Nicaraguan version.
The company has announced Castle Hall Nicaragua, which will use an Ecuadorian habano wrapper over a Nicaraguan binder and Nicaraguan fillers. It is being produced at American Caribbean Cigars S.A.
Castle Hall Nicaragua will be offered in the same three sizes as the Castle Hall Dominican:
Gurkha Castle Hall Nicaragua Robusto (5 x 52)$5.35 (Box of 20, $107)
Gurkha Castle Hall Nicaragua Toro (6 x 54)$5.65 (Box of 20, $113)
Gurkha Castle Hall Nicaragua Magnum (6 x 60) $5.95 (Box of 20, $119)
All right here at your friendly neighborhood Pipe Rack.